Home > Media Mentions > PRINT BOOKS AND EBOOKS STEADILY GROW IN 2011: WHY NOW IS A REMARKABLE (AND MARKETABLE) TIME FOR INDIE AUTHORS TO PUBLISH

PRINT BOOKS AND EBOOKS STEADILY GROW IN 2011: WHY NOW IS A REMARKABLE (AND MARKETABLE) TIME FOR INDIE AUTHORS TO PUBLISH

 

Published on Yaminatoday.com.

Depending on how you look at it, the 2011 steady growth of the publishing industry is either really good news (because you want to be part of this publishing boom), or really bad news, (because you hate competition).

Bowker, the global leader in bibliographic information, released itsannual report on U. S. print book publishing for 2011, compiled from its Books In Print® database, and based on preliminary figures from U.S. publishers, Bowker is projecting that traditional print book output grew six percent in 2011, from 328,259 titles in 2010 to a projected 347,178 in 2011, driven almost exclusively by a strong self-publishing market(that’s you, friend!) This is the most significant expansion in more than four years for America’s traditional publishing sector, though removing self-publishing from the equation would show that the market is relatively flat from 2010.

Yes, you heard right: that’s nearly 20,000 new titles that were produced by (mostly) self-pubbers in 2011, and make no mistake that this is a very marketable time for indie and self-published authors to enter the publishing world.

Kelley Gallagher, V.P. of Bowker Market Research: “Self-publishing is a true legitimate power to be reckoned with.” 

“Transformation of our industry has brought on a time of rich innovation in the publishing models we now have today,” said Kelly Gallagher, Vice-President, of Bowker Market Research. “What was once relegated to the outskirts of our industry—and even took on demeaning names like ‘vanity press’ is now not only a viable alternativebut what is driving the title growth of our industry today. From that standpoint, self-publishing is a true legitimate power to be reckoned with. Coupled with the explosive growth of e-books and digital content – these two forces are moving the industry in dramatic ways.”

This thrills me to hear since I, and many others of you out there, have decided to go the way of self-publishing and I’d venture to say that self-publishing, and the invention of e-books, are doing for the publishing world in 2012 what the printing press did for the common man back in 1440: they’re starting a literary revolution. Or maybe it’s closer to say a literary revolt? Who knows…

To be honest, while I am excited by the growth increase of self-published fueled print books, I am even more excited about the growth of ebooks by self-publishers, because ebook success is no longer contingent upon print book success.

According to an Amazon report of their best-sellers in 2011, (and according to a report I read Beyond-black-Friday.com) three of the 10 best-selling Kindle ebooks never even made into the top 100 bestselling printed books of the year. Why? Because those books were never released in a printed edition!

Are you hearing this, dear readers and aspiring writers?

The #1 and #2 best-selling ebooks of the year (which were The Mill River Recluse (#1), and The Abbey (#2)) did not have a printed version to “back them up”, so to speak.

This means ebooks are getting recognition entirely apart from printed books.

Also, of the top ten ebooks of the year, only three of them appeared on the list of the ten-bestselling printed books (Steve Jobs, A Stolen Lifeby Jaycee Lee Dugard and In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin.

That’s great news for those of us who might not be able to afford venturing into the print market right now.

Indeed, it couldn’t be more clear that Kindle owners are choosing their material from an entirely different universe of books than print books And this is where I am hoping the self-published authors really have a chance to shine.

Sure, we can’t compete in book stores or airports or Walmarts all across the nation if we’re not attached to the bigger publishing companies. But we can certainly compete in the e-book universe, and that’s a very resourceful and legitimate universe to play in.

But the good news doesn’t end there.

View full story.

 

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